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Should I Open Windows After a Storm to Avoid Running My AC?

by The Cooling Company, on Aug 9, 2016 9:00:00 PM

It is mid-summer in Nevada. No doubt, you are searching for hacks to cool down your home without running the air conditioning non-stop, or maybe you know you need air conditioning repairs and want to get by a couple days.

girl sitting at an open window 

Should You Open Windows and Doors to Avoid Running the AC?

Most people believe opening doors and windows will help cool down their house or apartment by letting in fresh air. The concept is not without merit. However, doing so is only successful when the air outside is cooler than the air inside such as at night or early in the morning. Otherwise, the practice will simply allow warmer air to permeate your already toasty house.

Be careful, though. You shouldn't decide whether to open doors and windows as a cooling down method based on the abstract notion of what it “feels like” outside. You may at times believe it is cooler outside than in your house, even when that’s not the case. One journalist used a portable digital thermometer to accurately measure the outside temperature for several days. In doing so, he realized he was keeping his windows open longer than he should or past the point when it was as warm or warmer outside than inside.

Opening Windows After a Storm

In the desert, a particularly good time to make use of your doors and windows is after storms, which quickly and significantly decrease the external temperature. As with any attempt to co-opt outside air to cool down you house, however, just opening those portals is not sufficient for indoor ventilation.

Utilizing a box fan, window fan or other portable fan in the window frame or by your screen door, in conjunction with opening the window and main door, will make a difference. After all, to accomplish a cooling down effect within your whole house, you must push out hot air in addition to pulling in cool air. You'll never get anywhere if the warm air continues to stay inside.

Related: Energy Saving Tips to Keep the Heat Outside This Summer

Utilizing Cross Breezes

A cross breeze will significantly help get the warm air out and the cool air in. Because of the increased circulation, rooms with inward blowing fans will cool down more swiftly than rooms with outward blowing fans.

If a desert storm transpires in the morning or early afternoon when there is potential for rising afternoon temperatures to follow, close the windows and doors after your house is sufficiently cooled down. Otherwise, you run the risk of allowing hot air to filter back inside as it warms up again.

Get That AC Taken Care of

Do you have questions or concerns about keeping your house cool or your HVAC system in general? Contact The Cooling Company at (702) 567-0707. 

Topics:HVAC Tips

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